Executive Functions and Poor behaviour

£22.99

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Welcome to Executive Functions and Poor behaviour

In this training session, we’ll explore the importance of executive function skills and their role in children’s development.

It includes training and resources to get you started.

  • Ideal for families and professionals
  • Perfect staff CPD
  • Includes CPD Certificate
  • Accessible for 14-days
  • This webinar is free to Extra, Ultimate, and Ultimate+ Members without any time restrictions.

In this training session, we will explore the importance of executive function skills and their pivotal role in children’s development. We will delve into research findings regarding exclusion and crime rates to highlight the importance of using effective strategies to support vulnerable children and young people. The training then looks at practical approaches for assessing emotionally dysregulated children to identify potential deficits in executive function skills.

Learning Objectives:

  • What are executive function skills and why are they so important?
  • What does the research into exclusion and crime rates tell us?
  • How can we help these children and young people?
  • How can we assess to identify if an emotionally dysregulated child has poor executive function skills?
  • How can we use this information to empower the child in recognising their strengths?
  • How can we use to help them overcome their barrier ?
  • How can these tools be used independently through life?

Resources

  • Executive Function Skills Activity Pack
  • Executive Skills Checklist
  • Planners
  • The Pomodoro Planner
  • Weekly Planner

Training Duration:  1hr 18mins

How to Access the Training

  • Add the item to your basket and proceed to checkout
  • Once the order is processed, it will appear in your account and receive an email confirmation
  • To access simply click on ‘Watch Webinar’
  • This link will remain valid for 14-days
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